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Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum


Author:APIAHF
Published:November 2013
Type:Fact Sheet
Language:English
State:Arizona
Topic:Affordable Care Act » Learn
Affordable Care Act

Author:APIAHF
Published:November 2013
Type:Webinar
Language:English
Topic:Affordable Care Act » Educate
Affordable Care Act

Author:APIAHF
Published:November 2013
Type:Webinar
Language:English
Topic:Affordable Care Act » Educate
Affordable Care Act

Author:APIAHF
Published:November 2013
Type:Webinar
Language:English
Topic:Health policy

Author:APIAHF
Published:November 2013
Type:Webinar
Language:English
Topic:Affordable Care Act » Educate
Affordable Care Act

Thanh

Language Access

Language barrier has always been an issue in my family. Before I went off to college, I was always there to interpret for my parents during their hospital visits. My family and I grew up in a predominately black and Hispanic community so most of the application and health information were provided in English and Spanish. I had to advocate for my parent’s health by talking with our caseworker numerous times about the application process of Medi-Cal and figure out all the policy and available resources that were provided.

Kay Bounkeua

Student

Before health care reform, I had to pay for private insurance which was a huge part of my already miniscule income as a graduate student. Regardless of coverage, it was extremely minimal and I often delayed or cancelled appointments that were crucial for preventative care.

Chi-Hsin Chang

Student

Before health care reform, I worked as a graduate assistant and the university provided me with health insurance so I could go to the school clinic for free. However, the insurance did not cover vision or dental. One time I had a serious toothache and I went to the school clinic and the only thing they could do was give me some painkiller and refer me to the school dentist, whom I saw after a week of waiting. Then the school dentist took a $100 or so for X-ray and recommended a root-canal surgery, but again they could only refer me to a bigger clinic for the surgery.

Tot 'Sy' Tran

New Orleans' Vietnamese Community Patient

Before health care reform, I was not provided with adequate language access. My name is Tot ‘Sy’ Tran and I live in New Orleans, Louisiana. I moved to this area in 1975 and have lived here since, enduring disasters like Hurricane Katrina and more recently, the Deepwater Horizon BP oil drilling disaster.

Jessica Huang

Student

For many young adults like me, it’s particularly difficult to afford insurance working in entry-level, low-wage or temporary jobs. It’s even harder when you are also going to school.

As a part-time student at a public university, and a part-time employee in a small business, I'm not eligible for health insurance through my school or my employer.