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We work to influence policy, mobilize communities, and strengthen programs and organizations to improve the health of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AAs and NHPIs).

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 Watson Coleman Leads Introduction of Resolution Recognizing Contributions of REACH Program

By: Courney Cochran | Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) joined with Tri-Caucus Chairs Karen Bass (D-Ca), Joaquin Castro (D-Tx) and Judy Chu (D-Ca), along with Reps. Tom Cole (R-Ok), Barbara Lee (D-Ca), Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Ca) and Robin Kelly (D-IL) to introduce H.Res. 570, a resolution commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health, or REACH, program.

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Press Releases

Public Charge Rule Blocked is a Win for Immigrant Families

WASHINGTON – Earlier today, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York issued a preliminary nationwide injunction prohibiting the Trump administration from enforcing its public charge rule before it was to take effect on October 15th. Since that ruling, additional federal district courts have issued similar injunctions. The discriminatory public charge rule…

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Featured Resources

Snapshot: Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Health

Fact Sheet

Asian Americans (AAs), Native Hawaiians (NHs), and Pacific Islanders (PIs) are the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups in the United States. These communities represent incredible diversity, spanning nearly one hundred different ethnic groups and speaking over 250 languages and dialects. As a result, their health needs and challenges are just as varied and diverse.

Snapshot: Immigrant Health in the United States

Fact Sheet

By 2065, the number of immigrants is expected to nearly double to 78 million, when one in three Americans will be an immigrant or have immigrant parents. Migration patterns will lead to change and Asians will overtake Hispanics as the largest incoming immigrant population in the country by 2065.